Bellbunya in the News

Bellbunya - building a community

by Sharon Mather 19 October 2016  https://sway.com/USxnEGfx6lHpEzMa


Encouraged by my curiosity and interest in sustainable living..this mysterious quality that if we are to sustain life..ignited this urgency in
myself... to make vital important lifestyle changes.

How better than to take a short trip into the Sunshine Coast hinterland...to a place of exquisite beauty...unspoilt...a peaceful haven with a strong
on respecting our Mother Earth.

For the next two weeks..Belbunya was to become my home..the residents my family.. community life a simple way of life.

As a part-time volunteer..we were responsible for maintaining everything connected to a permaculture living..the development of agricultural ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self-sufficient.

We arrived and were met by Joan..a long time resident..who introduced us to other members of the community and we were shown our dorm as well as a run down of how things work at Belbunya.

Impressive...I was to find out exactly how a community operates..a united working together of the principles of resurrecting the past living.. now
sadly lost in the rumblings of corporate greed.

This interested me enormously..how we are to revert our present situation of destruction..to the possibilities of clean green living..a vitally important issue needing little encouraging for others to change.

Few issues create more controversy than our present world..though it is not my purpose to ridicule... rather to change opposing ideas..that we
may all live peacefully..co-existing in a world with values and respect for all living things.

Has life got a purpose?..can we harmonise our lives enough to enable each of us to not only respect each other but also to bring about awareness of the importance of shared living space.

Consider the significance of these words..advocating or implementing social reform or new liberal ideas is the future to sustainability. It is a misconception that we can continue to destroy and plunder everything for the benefit of a few moneyed individuals..this is faulty thinking and we must change this mindset. Our logical conclusion after reviewing the design of nature.. is to follow the natural patterns and cycles of life..handed down for generations.

Humans with all their advanced technology..create countless tons of unrecyclable toxic waste annually.

Yet the earth recycles all it's waste perfectly..using ingenious chemical engineering.

This system is applied perfectly at Belbunya.. by means of permaculture methods. In the context of social values and responsibilities the community
collectively encourages each member to work within these guidelines..producing vegetable gardens..bee hives and eco-friendly buildings.

I was to work in the gardens surrounding the main community building..weeding..pruning and recycling all back into the soil. Nothing is
wasted..even the chooks were fed the weeds.

Breakfast was a "help yourself" as was lunch..the variety of such a high standard one could certainly get very healthy within a few weeks. Dinner was a shared on roster affair..which encouraged all who stayed to be ingenious in creating delicious meals fit for a king..or queen.

It certainly was a very wonderful shared space..where conversations were never interrupted by blaring TV's. So conversations were always interesting as was the level of talent in the music side of things..Guitars were available as was a piano and many a good interaction was had by all. Having watched the entire process of honey extraction and spinning to extract the honey was most interesting..me and my camera silently standing taking it all in. Independence of thought is encouraged as is following no real set rules..one does what it takes to keep the community ticking over..and jobs are varied and by choice. this kept a lovely flow amongst everyone as pressure was removed. We shared many different meals..organic at all times..varied and delicious. My first evening was spent at their dam..where a barbecue was the order of the day. A sushi evening was an absolute
 hit..where Alison and Mae worked their perfection to ensure not a morsel remained.

All in all it was the most wonderful experience for me..leaving was the hardest part..

But I will be back..without a doubt..this is the way I want to live..eat and I encourage anyone with the conscious to change bad living habits..to visit Belbunya.. You will go back

My thanks to all the permanent residents who went out of their way to include everyone..

To Joan..a mentor..gentle in her approach and such a wonderful spirit to be beside..dedicated to taking time to listen to everyone.

The "two Carsons"..fun..smiling..entertaining..with a vast knowledge of the workings of community.

Andrew..the "mega mower man"..unbeatable on the electric mower..always busy..always working.

Nai'ida and Naja..a couple who encouraged youth to a more sustainable and spiritual life..and of course the expert guitar playing Naja..always
willing to listen

To Karen..a hard worker..with good intentions..

Alison..talkative..playful and so funny..a good community person.

Emma..sweet and always a smile..

and lastly to Tomas..I hope you become a robotics engineer..

Thank you all for your time..kindness and willingness to share your living space.

Sharon Mather

Writer/Editor

Co-Founder VOWW/Voices for women and children worldwide


Preservation key to wildlife future

Eumundi Green, 5 July 2012, page 19

Bellbunya is a rural 40 acre property in Belli Park on the Sunshine Coast Hinterland, which lies between the West Cooroy State Forest and Mapleton Forest Reserve. The property has been regenerated during the last 20 years to create wildlife corridors and sanctuaries for animals moving between these major habitats. It has an underground river, springs, a large billabong and the headwaters of a significant Belli Creek tributary. The property contains a huge selection of native fauna and flora, including platypus, sugar gliders, echidnas, possums, bandicoots, native fish species and a diverse range of frogs and birds.

To aid in the process of this regeneration, Bellbunya has recently started a programme to bring foreign students to the property to assist with the work. Currently a group of Americans have come over to our shores on the ISV scheme (International Student Volunteers) and combined with the Mary River Catchment Care group and the local Shire Council they are in the process of clearing weeds and planting native species to encourage biodiversity along Belli Creek and the riparian zones. But this is no ordinary process for the methods are entirely organic. No easy task clearing areas of invasive species without the use of sprays but the current team of students under the ISV scheme and despite the rain have been busy clearing vast areas and learning all about the ecosystems. They were privileged to witness a swimming platypus whilst they were working just last week.

Bellbunya hope to continue planting 12,000 trees. Many of them koala trees to help with their recovery numbers on the Sunshine Coast Hinterland and welcome people keen to help. They run various project times and if you’d like to assist with this wonderful enterprise to boost our wildlife numbers contact the team at Bellbunya on 5447 0181 or email: karyn@bellbunya.org.au.

They also welcome visits from locals interested in seeing their venture unfold.
The Americans staying at Bellbunya on the ISV scheme (International Student Volunteers).

North American Students Saving Mary River Tributary

Mary Valley Voice, 20 June 2012, page 8

An International Student Volunteer group from half way around the world has come to Bellbunya Eco-Retreat and Sustainable Community at Belli Park to restore important Koala habitat. This area of land is the perfect wildlife corridor. It is a vital link between the West Cooroy and Mapleton Forest and its creek feeds into the Mary River. Many endangered species such as the Giant Barred Frog and the Coxen’s fig-parrot are able to find their home in the native plants.

The student volunteers have come to Bellbunya Community to help with the clearing and replanting of the land. In weeding the area around Bellbunya, the students will get the project underway for restoring the native species and encouraging the wildlife to inhabit and thrive. Diana Gora, nineteen year-old from Ontario, Canada exclaims, “It is amazing the amount of work that ten people can do in one day!” On the first day alone, the group cleared 500 square meters of land down by the creek. They worked to remove Lantana, Desmodium, and unwanted vines. After an area was cleared, native plants were brought in to add biodiversity to the area.

The Bellbunya community is always looking for any willing volunteers to join them in their passion for this growing project. “The project is consistently operating, but it is the volunteers that visit who give the push to achieve their ultimate goal,” says Jared Wellman, 22 from Arizona, USA. 

The next group of student volunteers is arriving in June, and on Monday 25 June all are welcome to come learn how to repair and revegetate creek lines and forests. Marc Russell, a local Council Wildlife officer will be available to lead the discussion.

Photo by Karyn Maher, from left at the back: Beth Harvey, Katy Capobianco, Jennifer Abtosway, Diana Gora, Jared Wellman. From left front row: Brittany Kuhn, Lilli Nicholson (ISV team leader), Larissa Velasco, Joshua Wittkowske.

Diana labelling


Making communities viable

Eco News, July 2010
http://econews.org.au/making-communities-viable/

By Paul Mischefski

Working bee and Communities Convergence Conference at Bellbunya Communit

The movement towards a return to living in communities is one that is growing in momentum in Australia and world-wide.

Smaller micro-communities and larger ventures are springing up alongside others that have been long-established.

It is a movement that is being fuelled by awareness and a growing bulk of eco-scientific evidence that intensive living in sprawling cities, booming population growth, spiralling property prices, pressure on water supply and infrastructure and a world facing finite and dwindling resources is a recipe for unsustainability.

Governments have been pursuing a cheery and seemingly reassuring drive towards a healthy-appearing economy. But the underlying disquiet over sustainability is becoming too loud to ignore.

Several years ago I interviewed Richard Heinberg, from California, one of the world’s leading authorities on the anticipated/looming peak oil crisis.

Richard’s medium-term vision for Australia was one of people in cities being forced to divide into smaller, more sustainable urban communities focussed around co-operative growing of community-garden food sources and shared resources.

Once fuel becomes too expensive or sparse to support the agricultural industry and the transport of food supplies to hungry cities relying on the food chain of local supermarkets, people will have little option but to adapt to a massive change in lifestyle and approach to self sustainability.

As Richard pointed out, much of the world has been complacent over the need to learn the skills to support a new way of existence. It is part of human nature to leave things until it is forced upon us and then rely on crisis management.

Some conditioned to materialism and convenience will do it painfully, others will adapt with resilience. But it does not need to be an issue around fear. Richard predicted that those who do adapt to the change proactively will help to create a new paradigm of human co-operation and a much more enlightened and healthy society based on people values.

Many spearheading the movement towards communities are pioneering new methods of resourcefulness and skills sharing, it is an evolving industry of learning and adaptation.

Yet many people also consider a move to community living with a mixture of curiosity, dread, some fear and uncertainty over losing independence and whether or not it is a truly viable option.

SUCCESSFUL COMMUNITIES

Creating a successful community requires some fundamental elements, which can be viewed as a balance of Yin and Yang, or head and heart – Spiritual values and communication to support people and resolve human issues, and effective organisational systems to keep practical day-to-day needs running efficiently and maintain progress.

Where many communities struggle is in not having an effective organisational or project management system to share the inevitable workload and development that needs to take place.

It often falls on the shoulders of a few inspired people who eventually lose motivation and become discouraged.

One well-proven system involves dividing the community up into key areas of responsibility that are each overseen by a small working group, meaning all bases can be covered.

Effective use of time/energy and “people-power” teams means the whole community can move as a workforce resource around these different areas and knock out what needs to be done, under the direction of the relevant working group and using checklists they have devised.

A team of 12 working in a concerted way for just a few hours, or one hour a day, can achieve what a few people would take a week to do. With a bit of practice and commitment, it can become very streamlined.

The Spiritual health benefits to the community come from a great boost in morale from the teamwork, a sense of achievement and progress, and a learning of tolerance and camaraderie from working alongside others.

It is building this sort of co-operative effort and team contribution mindset that will be a strong and vital asset in years to come. Traditional communities like the Amish of North America, through to the tribal communities of the Pacific Islands and New Zealand have always had this down-pat.

Likewise they always take time to celebrate and acknowledge their achievements, which can be one of the great joys of living in community. Singing, jokes, conversation, building valuable, genuine friendships and a shared meal afterwards are great motivators.

PERSONAL IDENTITY

Often one of the biggest arguments to living in community and one of the biggest reasons why people leave, or resist the desire to live in community, is the feeling of losing the “sense of self”, or being absorbed in the needs of the community and the issues of others.

The system above is one key in helping to overcome this. When people know there are consistently scheduled times when they can fulfil their contribution to community and responsibilities are clarified, the rest of their time and independence becomes clear.

A Spiritual mentor I had always had a favourite saying: “When things are organised, people are relaxed. When things are disorganised, people get under pressure.” It is an important energy to understand.

Another vital key, particularly in a close community is having a clear understanding of the distinct and different energies of personal time, business time and social time. And likewise personal space, business space and social space. It is a necessary advance on understanding healthy boundaries, and very effective.

Living in community can sometimes be like living in a giant share house. There is always someone who wants to chat when others are trying to stay focused on important business or earning a living from their space within the community. Fragmentation and distraction can be energy-sapping and the financial vitality of the community as a whole can suffer if this area is not understood clearly and practised proactively and with a positive, co-operative attitude.

SPIRITUAL WELLBEING

The Spiritual health or wellbeing of a community can also determine its overall vitality and success.

Community living by its very nature can attract people who are inherently creative and possibly a little rebellious against the idea of status quo. It is often why they have left the mainstream.

Recognising and appreciating this and giving it space and direction to flourish can utilise some of people’s strongest assets. Anywhere there are people living together there will unavoidably be conflicts and differences of opinion. It is vital to have regular communication or clearing circles where the community gets together as a whole and creates a genuine, safe “heart space” to hear each other fairly and focus on creating solutions to give that energy direction.

Nothing can cause frustration and resentment in people more than feeling they are not being heard or listened to. Over time, small grievances can build into larger resentment if regular clearing circles are not being held. What is not being expressed will still be felt uncomfortably on an intuitive level.

Heart circles can require some good facilitation skills, and if the role is shared around it can become a major area of personal growth for anyone. Done well, the heart circles can also be a great area of personal growth, communication and character development, moral support and personal wellbeing for many.

Communities which have a common Spiritual belief and values focus, such as Buddhism, already have a great advantage.

Where this is not the case, a mixture of different beliefs and values systems can benefit from having a concerted focus effort to reach agreement on the core values and mission statement of the community.

Some form of optional Spiritual development group, as well as healthy lifestyle practices such as yoga and meditation, can become the life blood and cultural richness of a community and nourish its people.

Communicating or relating workshops such as the increasingly popular Non-Violent Communication can be a vital asset for maintaining harmony.

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

Living in a closer community can sometimes be like an ongoing workshop, and it can also be a great deal of fun and growth and source of enduring friendships. It helps greatly if people have the character resilience of a sense of humour and some personal development training, or if this is an ongoing activity within the community.

Areas of self-awareness like tolerance, patience, listening skills, good verbal communication, respect for people’s space and views, honesty and integrity can become valuable assets to getting on with others.

It is a good basis also if people become aware of their own motivations and what is involved in living in community, so it is a clear and conscious choice. Finding a community that resonates in values is a wise move also.

LEARNING CENTRES

It can be a great benefit if a community sets up its own 'learning centre', where people with different skills can run workshops or exchange knowledge or services and healing modalities.

This can create an avenue for bringing income and valuable cashflow opportunities into the community also.

Often communities have a particular strength or success they have developed, such as renewable energy source, developing biodynamic or permaculture food supply, cottage industries, low-cost building practices, or obtaining grants and funding.

A project I am working on with a few other community-builders is developing an exchange network between communities where facilitators can travel to share their individual skills and knowledge with other organisations.

As these various aspects of a community and its structure develop and strengthen, they begin to attract more of the type of people with the skills and motivation to want to help make a difference.

With the right approach, communities can become a vibrant, efficient, growing and viable option for sustainable living and shared resources, rich in people and culture.

***

WORKSHOPS

Paul will run a series of workshops at the Bellbunya Community eco-conference centre, at Belli Park, 10km from Eumundi, on the Eumundi – Kenilworth Rd.

Saturday, July 31, from 6.30pm – 9pm:  COMMUNICATE AND LISTEN, on safe relating and heart circle skills. Cost $30.

Sunday, August 1, from 8.30am to 5pm: MANAGING EFFICIENT COMMUNITY, this will include setting up a community project management system that can be adapted for share-housing or a business.  Cost $100. Bring a plate for shared lunch.

Monday, August 2, For those wanting to stay overnight, practical coaching on team-building projects will run from 9am to noon.
Bookings:  (07) 5447-0181 or  0429-478-129, or paulmis@powerup.com.au

See: www.bellbunya.org.au for details.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Paul Mischefski profile image

Paul Mischefski is a journalist, photographer, environment and social issues writer and lifeskills trainer. He has studied communities from the Pacific Island and New Zealand cultures to the Amish of North America and societies in Northern India. Paul has lectured extensively throughout the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand and spent several years in the US helping to manage a world-wide chain of Spiritual retreat centres. He runs Spirit In Organisation Processes For Communities.






Building with Cob

EcoNews, June 2010

http://econews.org.au/building-with-cob/

Building with cob

Cob lends itself to organic shapes.The word "cob" comes from an old English root meaning "a lump or rounded mass".

Cob builders use their hands and feet to form lumps of earth mixed with clay, straw and sand. It is a sensory and aesthetic experience similar to sculpting with clay. Cob is very easy to learn and inexpensive to build.

Because there are no forms, ramming, cement or rectilinear bricks, cob lends itself to organic shapes: curved walls, arches and vaults. Earthen houses are cool in summer and warm in winter.

Cob has been used for millennia, even in the harsh climates of southern England, where thousands of comfortable and picturesque homes have been continuously occupied for many centuries. In fact, earth homes, built in this free form manner, have existed around the world for thousands of years.

Welshman Ianto Evans and American Linda Smiley, of "Oregon Cob" fame, brought Cob to Australia in 1995, teaching a workshop in Caboolture. Linda McKee and Mal McKenna continued teaching Cob until 2000. Since then, Mal and his builder friend, Michael Leo, have succeeded in getting Council approval for a Cob building, which will be built in the near future. In the meantime, Alan Atkinson of Eco Homes and Gardens has formed a new partnership with Mal, who lives at Bellbunya Eco Conference Centre, to bring Cob  building into the mainstream of new green housing approaches, beginning with an exciting series of Cob building workshops at Bellbunya.

Because earth is non-toxic and completely recyclable, many people searching for a more eco-friendly lifestyle are bound to embrace this living, breathing choice of home. Further, Cob is ideal for owner-builders, who can have friends help out with this easily learned form. The cob lump goes straight from the mixing spot to the wall, where it is knitted in using feet, hands and blunt sticks to form one mass -- a hand sculpted home. The lumps are made to your size, making it easy for children to be involved. It is a very safe work site; there are no power tools, as we encourage the use of hand tools and as little timber as possible. ??Zenning in tranquility, laughter and fun is the sustainable standard we seek, and the occasional 'Aha', as another cobber 'gets it' -- that feeling of cob in action.

No, Cob is not a fast process: it can be made timeless, though, when we get that right mix of soul and mind. You might as well take your time slowly building your home which, if tended to lovingly over the years, will stand proudly for years to come.

An introductory Cob Building Seminar will be held on the 26th May at 7pm and the first Cob Building Workshop from July 26th-31st at Bellbunya Eco-Conference Centre, 114 Browns Road, Belli Park, near Eumundi.

Contact Mal on 07 5447 0181 or Alan on 0402494252.

Image Credit: www.cobprojects.info


Bellbunya partnership brings solar focus to the hinterland

The Mary Valley Voice, 20 May 2010
http://www.maryvalleyvoice.com/ThreadView.aspx?tid=31667

Posted by  Subeditor from Palmwoods on 20/05/2010 at 10:21 AM in Community / Mary Valley

When: Monday, 24th May from 11:30am – 2:30pm

Where: Bellbunya Sustainable Community & Eco-Retreat Centre, 114 Browns Road, Belli Park

What30 TAFE Renewable Energy students will be installing 7.2KVA solar systems and display at the newly opened eco-venue at Belli Park in a renewable energy partnership With the controversial new Energex Sub-Station and high voltage power lines proposed for Eumundi and BelliPark, local environment groups have been keen to demonstrate solar as a viable alternative. 89

A partnership between Nambour TAFE renewable energy students, and the community based Bellbunya eco-venue in Belli Park, will see 7.2KVA of solar power being fed into the grid at Belli Park.

The solar project, incorporating cutting edge technology in harnessing the sun’s energy, will be on show at Bellbunya, a sustainable community and eco-retreat operated by local Association for Sustainable communities Inc.

The Association President, Karyn Maher, welcomed the project as timely for the region.

“As the Sunshine Coast’s rapid population growth causes pressure on existing energy supplies, we have a choice on how we respond.

“Local residents are rightly concerned about the impacts and costs of infrastructure to increase electricity supply from centralised coal power stations.

“Our project will show how simple and cost-effective it can be to make energy on-site and reduce power usage, and on sunny days will be feeding renewable power to homes in the neighbourhood.

“The project will include dynamic and static displays at the Bellbunya Community Hall, where people gather during eco-retreats and sustainability conferences.”

The project was made possible through a grant of $33,000 from the Gambling Community Benefit Fund, and through a partnership with Nambour TAFE Renewable Energy students.

TAFE lecturer, Winslow Leveque, said TAFE students were enjoying hands-on learning about renewable energy through the project.

“We should not underestimate the value of renewable energy as a cost-effective solution to sustainability.

“Major projects, such as the proposed Eumundi Sub-station, can be avoided by households and businesses reducing their reliance on grid power, especially during hot days when power demand is at its peak.

“It is at these peak times that solar power is most efficient.

“We’re enjoying working with the Association for Sustainable Communities in its holistic approach to sustainability, and helping them raise public awareness of renewable energy.”

Contact Karyn Maher
President, Association for Sustainable Communities Inc
114 Browns Road, Belli Park,  Q  4562
T (07) 5447 0181 / 07 5315 5041
info@sustainable-communities.org
www.sustainable-communities.org.au


Bellbunya revs up eco-agriculture

FOR about 20 years Bellbunya, a 40 acre property at Belli Park, was operated as a corporate retreat and conference facility.

Chris Gibbings on the new tractor.

Contributed

For about 20 years Bellbunya, a 40 acre property at Belli Park, was operated as a corporate retreat and conference facility.

In December, 2008, this idyllic space was purchased by The Association for Sustainable Living and rebirthed as the Bellbunya Community.

The Bellbunya Community aims to create a place to model, implement and teach sustainable living.

Their holistic sustainable approach is applied ecologically, socially, economically and spiritually as well as culturally.

Director Karyn Maher said their efforts in this area have received a huge boost thanks to a $33,000 grant from the Queensland Government’s Gambling Community Benefit Fund.

The grant has made their dream of teaching and promoting eco-agriculture come one step closer.

The grant has gone towards the purchase of a tractor with a four-in-one bucket.

Among its many uses, it will allow community members to make their own organic compost and gather and mix materials for earth building.

Spokesperson Chris Gibbings said the tractor will be a huge support to regenerate and care for the land.

It will allow them to fence animals away from Belli Creek, increase biodiversity and model permaculture food forests.

“As a fertile area with high rainfall, agriculture is a major activity of the hinterland for a variety of small-scale and lifestyle farmers.

“We aim to build the knowledge, desire and skill base of local growers to grow healthy food in sustainable ways.

“We support and run sustainability workshops from Bellbunya.

“And we are currently working with the community to develop sustainable land use plans for the centre.

“We are always open to new partnerships and projects that build more sustainable futures.

“We welcome groups to use Bellbunya as a base for workshops and conferences and actively promote holistically sustaining, relocalised communities.”

To use the centre or find out more about the sustainable agriculture project, contact Karyn on 5447 0181 or www.bellbunya.org.au.


Bellbunya revs up eco-agriculture

FOR about 20 years Bellbunya, a 40 acre property at Belli Park, was operated as a corporate retreat and conference facility.

Chris Gibbings on the new tractor.

Contributed

For about 20 years Bellbunya, a 40 acre property at Belli Park, was operated as a corporate retreat and conference facility.

In December, 2008, this idyllic space was purchased by The Association for Sustainable Living and rebirthed as the Bellbunya Community.

The Bellbunya Community aims to create a place to model, implement and teach sustainable living.

Their holistic sustainable approach is applied ecologically, socially, economically and spiritually as well as culturally.

Director Karyn Maher said their efforts in this area have received a huge boost thanks to a $33,000 grant from the Queensland Government’s Gambling Community Benefit Fund.

The grant has made their dream of teaching and promoting eco-agriculture come one step closer.

The grant has gone towards the purchase of a tractor with a four-in-one bucket.

Among its many uses, it will allow community members to make their own organic compost and gather and mix materials for earth building.

Spokesperson Chris Gibbings said the tractor will be a huge support to regenerate and care for the land.

It will allow them to fence animals away from Belli Creek, increase biodiversity and model permaculture food forests.

“As a fertile area with high rainfall, agriculture is a major activity of the hinterland for a variety of small-scale and lifestyle farmers.

“We aim to build the knowledge, desire and skill base of local growers to grow healthy food in sustainable ways.

“We support and run sustainability workshops from Bellbunya.

“And we are currently working with the community to develop sustainable land use plans for the centre.

“We are always open to new partnerships and projects that build more sustainable futures.

“We welcome groups to use Bellbunya as a base for workshops and conferences and actively promote holistically sustaining, relocalised communities.”

To use the centre or find out more about the sustainable agriculture project, contact Karyn on 5447 0181 or www.bellbunya.org.au.


Climate Change Wake-up Call

The Mary Valley Voice, 14 October 2009, page 16
http://www.maryvalleyvoice.com/Issues/Downloads/item_670.pdf

With world leaders meeting for critical talks on climate change, local residents took part in a Climate Action Brunch to show their support for a fair, ambitious and binding new treaty.

The gathering held at the Bellbunya Sustainable Community and Eco-Conference Centre in Belli Park was one of more than 2000 gatherings held world wide as part of a synchronised wake-up call to world leaders. Spokesperson Karyn Maher described the Bellbunya event as a “fun, peaceful call to action.”

“People all over the world are ringing bells, sounding alarms and contacting politicians to let them know we want to see more being done to address climate change and create sustainable, green economies,” she said.

Experts say a UN climate pact in Copenhagen in December risks failure unless world leaders revive boggeddown negotiations.

The meeting at Bellbunya is part of international TCKTCKTCK campaign by major environmental and charitable groups to promote the ticking-clock urgency of climate change.

“Arising out of our gathering, a number of local environmental groups are collaborating to organise a Climate Change night next month at Bellbunya. The night will feature speakers, a film presentation and a low-food mile dinner,” she said.

People interested in becoming involved in the event should contact Karyn at the Bellbunya Sustainable Community and Eco-Conference Centre 5447 0181 or email Karyn@bellbunya.org.au.